Minor typos and modifications
authorSanjeev Gupta <ghane0@gmail.com>
Fri, 22 May 2015 03:41:06 +0000 (11:41 +0800)
committerGary E. Miller <gem@rellim.com>
Fri, 29 May 2015 01:15:17 +0000 (18:15 -0700)
Signed-off-by: Gary E. Miller <gem@rellim.com>
www/troubleshooting.html

index ac7ccb6..336c009 100644 (file)
@@ -133,9 +133,9 @@ vendor and product ID of your USB-serial converter device.</p>
 you should see an additional line indicating a new device.  Expect the
 new line to describe a serial-to-USB adapter chip, often (but not
 always) the Prolific Technology PL2303.  Then run <b>dmesg(8)</b>,
-looking for a message indicating a new USB device of that kind and
-giving you the device path - <code>/dev/ttyUSBn</code> for some number
-n.</p>
+looking near the end for a message indicating a new USB device of 
+that kind and giving you the device path - <code>/dev/ttyUSBn</code> 
+for some number n.</p>
 
 <p>If you have installed a GPSD binary package on a Linux system and
 are using a USB GPS, you should not need to start gpsd manually,
@@ -158,8 +158,8 @@ running:</p>
 <pre>sudo rm /var/run/gpsd.sock</pre>
 
 <h2>Ensure no other programs are using your device</h2>
-<p>Tools like modemmanager might be sing your device, probably
-automatically attached to it by udev/systemd. To check if your
+<p>Tools like modemmanager might be using your device, probably
+automatically attached to it by udev or systemd. To check if your
 device is ready to be used by gpsd try running <b>lsof(8)</b>
 and search the output for your GPS device path (for example
 <code>lsof -n | grep /dev/ttyUSB0</code>). If something is
@@ -236,10 +236,11 @@ sure <a href="#hotplugtroubleshooting">udev is working correctly</a>.</p>
 <p>If you pull the plug on the receiver, gpsd will note the change.</p>
 
 <p>With the receiver plugged in and gpsd running as above, you can
-launch a client. <code>xgps</code> comes with the distribution. On some Linuxes, it
-may be in a separate package, e.g. gpsd-clients. You should then see a
-lot of traffic between gpsd and the client in the gpsd terminal
-window. For example, here's a fix as reported by gpsd:</p>
+launch a client. <code>xgps</code> comes with the distribution. 
+On some Linuxes, it may be in a separate package, e.g. gpsd-clients. 
+You should then see a lot of traffic between gpsd and the client in 
+the gpsd terminal window. For example, here's a fix as reported by 
+gpsd:</p>
 
 <pre>gpsd: SiRF: MND 0x02: time=1293859466.85 lat=42.64 lon=-118.21 alt=1315.15 track=0.00 speed=0.00 mode=1 status=0 hdop=0.00 used=0 mask={TIME|LATLON|ALTITUDE|SPEED|TRACK|STATUS|MODE|DOP|USED}</pre>
 
@@ -295,7 +296,7 @@ client packages can force installation of gpsd as well. This can also
 happen on debian systems when apt is set up to install recommended
 packages as dependencies.</p>
 
-<p>One culprit are packages like
+<p>One culprit is packages like
 <a href="http://www.tangogps.org/">tangogps</a>, which recommendd gpsd.
 Fortunately, since it recommends gpsd, you can install it using
 <code>apt-get install --no-install-recommends</code> or disable the
@@ -338,6 +339,9 @@ Escape character is '^]'.
 {&quot;class&quot;:&quot;VERSION&quot;,&quot;release&quot;:&quot;2.96~dev&quot;,&quot;rev&quot;:&quot;2011-03-15T03:05:33&quot;,&quot;proto_major&quot;:3,&quot;proto_minor&quot;:4}
 </pre>
 
+<p>Note that the <code>release</code> strings will be different in 
+your case.</p>
+
 <p>To see data from the receiver in JSON (if any), enter the command
 <samp>?WATCH={&quot;enable&quot;:true,&quot;json&quot;:true}</samp>. To
 end JSON output, <samp>?WATCH={&quot;enable&quot;:false}</samp>. Then